October 17, 2020

Killing Floor, Zombies & Horror For Spooktober 2020

Are you ready for some more horror for Spooktober? If yes, then you’re in the right place. Killing Floor and its sequel, Killing Floor 2 is the game pick for us, while 28 Days Later is the movie selection. Why these two you might ask?

Well, because we feel that they go hand in hand. They’re also both featuring global pandemic (albeit zombie/mutant inducing pandemic, but still- a pandemic) and we thought that it coincides with the situation in 2020. Indeed, the global pandemic that we’re experiencing is menacing enough (luckily sans zombies), but why not make it a theme for our Spooktober event? Yup, for some it may seem way too close to home, but virus/zombie movies have existed before this ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. So, might as well make the best out of it. Oh, and if you’re not interested in watching Cillian Murphy killing zombies, perhaps you’d want him in an period piece setting? I already did a 2 separate posts about his cool TV series Peaky Blinders. Check them out here. And here. You’re welcome fans of Cillian. You’re welcome.

Killing Floor

Killing Floor Is Next On Our Agenda

What agenda? Spooktober agenda of course. Our weekly scare-fest event here at IndieGala. And why it’s next on our Spooktober agenda? Because of the incredible and eerie similarities that the game has with our weekly Spooktober movie selection. 28 Days Later is our pick, and yeah it’s awesome. Both (the Killing Floor game and the 28 Days Later movie) are set around London, both of them involve virus infections that turn humans into zombies/mutants. And both of them happen after an experiment has gone awry. Oh, and both of these incidents occurred after a human error. We really brought evil upon ourselves. Yup, it’s our own fault, and frankly, it’s not the first time that it happens. No to mention they’re both some of the finest examples of the survival horror genre. Scary, dark and somehow embedded in our current reality.

But let’s start with Killing Floor. What’s so special about it, and what’s so spooky about it? Well, before I get into the details about the Killing Floor -video game, let me just mention that we have it on sale. Well, technically Killing Floor is currently not on sale. But Killing Floor 2 (the digital deluxe version too) and Killing Floor Incursion very much are. Hop in and take your pick, because as you can probably tell, that sale is not going to last that much longer. Hurry up and stock up. Halloween is just around the corner.

  • Killing Floor

What’s Killing Floor All About?

Developed and published by Tripwire Interactive, Killing Floor is a fascinating and frightening first-person shooter survival horror game that takes place in London, England. However, within the game, the Horzine Biotech, company is contracted to conduct experiments of a military nature. Such as mass cloning and genetic manipulation and you get the picture. So, of course, something goes horribly wrong during the process of experimentation, and human subjects begin to exhibit grotesque mutations and disfigurement. They become increasingly hostile and eventually overrun the internal security forces of the corporation.

Moreover, the British government is desperate to contain the outbreak from reaching overseas (by the mutated scientist Dr. Kevin “The Patriarch” Clamel). So, the government quickly begins to organize ragtag teams of surviving British Army soldiers and Special Branch police officers. Why? In order to fight back against the hordes of mutated “specimens of course.” You will take on the role of a member of one of these teams and partake in missions in and around London. More than 33 weapons are on your disposal, a team of welders, medical tools and body armor too, and there are 10 monsters for you to kill. Are you up for it? You’d better be.

Killing Floor

28 Days Later Is Truly An Awesome Movie

I mean can you expect anything less from Danny Boyle and Alex Garland? Nope, and I can still to this day even defend their previous collaboration too. The Beach. But I suppose that’s a topic for a whole different post. I’m here about 28 Days Later, and yes. 18 years later, it’s still one of the best horror movies out there. Led by a fantastic Cillian Murphy in the lead role, 28 Days Later is a true marvel of cinematic achievement. Think about it. Although it may look like it has an amateur quality to it, it’s actually very complex and poignant in the visual presentation of the story. It’s expressive without going over the top. Both in the portrayal of the pandemic and the zombies. And I love it.

Naomie

Beautiful Storytelling And Fine Acting

But in its essence, the movie is a road movie as much as it’s a survival horror movie. Perhaps even more. If you look closely, the cinematography (from Anthony Dod Mantle) is steeped into blue-ish, almost grey colors. And muted tones darker tones I might add that blend perfectly with the tone of the movie. As if, it was immersing you into the bleak, claustrophobic world of a terrifying catastrophic event just with your eyes. Frankly, that’s more than enough. Yes, the dialogue is stingy and somewhat bare, but the visuals pick up where Garland’s script is severely lacking.

And the title is self-explanatory of the plot I might add. After a brief intro to the story (the origins of the pandemic), the plot actually picks up… 28 Days Later. Hence the title. With Jim (Cillian Murphy) waking up from a deserted hospital in London. He’ll eventually find survivors along the way. And together they’ll venture out in the countryside to find sanctuary from the hell that they’re currently living in. But will it be the sanctuary they need?

  • Movie

The Editing Is Awesome Too

And if you take another closer look at the movie, you’ll notice an intriguing duality in 28 Days Later. The majority of the movie is composed of these quiet scenes. Scenes of the characters driving, talking or just exploring, And you might even get a glimpse of the charters enjoying themselves in the middle of all the horror.

They are bonding together, shopping for groceries in a supermarket together, and they help each other in their time of need. They’ll even stop for a moment to marvel at a family of horses. I call them the calm before the storm scenes. The true brilliance of Boyle’s talent lies in the zombie related scenes. But the editing is truly at its peak there as well. In the fast-paced zombie attack scenes, and even in the charged crescendo at the mansion near the end. It’s as twisted and weird as you can imagine, and the editing helps to make it scarier.

Those are the true horror moments, and although they’re as numerous as i’d like, they’re frantic nonetheless. Violent, bloody and fantastic. Aggressive is another word I’d use on them, while chaotic is another. And they’re done with lots of shaky cam in between, which is nice. But there’s one little slice of genius from Danny Boyle in this movie. It’s barely noticeable but it’s there. The slight but effective Dutch angle shots. They also give out a sense of paranoia and uncertainty but yeah. They’re effective in bringing out the horror even in the most simplest scenes. Some directors really can use the Dutch shots wisely, and Danny Boyle is one of those exceptions.

Movie

Superb Supporting Characters For A Great Movie

And yes, although Cillian is in the lead role (and he’s the one that’s driving the story from start to finish), I have to mention the incredible performances from Naomie Harris, Brendan Gleeson (as my second favorite character Frank). And of course, the incredible Christopher Eccleston in one of the most chilling and haunting roles ever. 28 Days Later is truly a great movie. Although slightly unconventional for typical survival horror, 28 Days Later is a true gem. It’s worth revisiting this October. At least it was for me.

Killing Floor And 28 Days Later… Which One Is Your Favorite?

Which one do you prefer? Or should I say, which one will you be indulging this week? Let us know about your impressions of both the video game and the movie. We’d love to know all about them.

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